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Nushama Featured by Lucid News on Navigating New York City’s Ketamine Clinics

“Navigating New York City’s Ketamine Clinics” was published November 24, 2021 on Lucid News. A big thank you to Sophie Saint Thomas, Ken Jordan, and Faye Sakellaridis for this feature!

This blog post includes an excerpt from the post—read the complete article here.

Walking into Nushama, a new psychedelic wellness center in Manhattan, feels like entering a boutique hotel. There’s calming pastel art by Navina Khatib on the walls, murals and silk flowers, and at the recent opening of its new office, a harpist plays. The treatment rooms have pristine white zero-gravity chairs. Copies of books such as How to Change Your Mind by Michael Pollan sit on chic minimalist bookshelves.

At first glance, one wouldn’t think people coping with debilitating conditions such as treatment-resistant depression and eating disorders are here for therapy. But not just any therapy ⁠— ketamine-assisted psychotherapy, one of the few legal psychedelic medicines currently available and sanctioned by medical institutions.

Ketamine is FDA-approved in the form of the nasal spray Spravato (esketamine), for treatment-resistant depression. While generic, or “racemic” ketamine – the form that is used for intravenous infusions – is a mixture of two mirror-image molecules, “R” and “S” ketamine, the FDA-approved nasal spray, Spravato (esketamine) only contains the “S” molecule.

Most of the research on ketamine in clinical trials for mental health is done using off-label ketamine infusions, which tend to occur at ketamine clinics. As a result, clinics, which look like everything from a med spa to an art gallery, are cropping up all over the country, including progressive and wealthy cities such as New York.

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